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  • Southside

Young scientists tackle the big issues at RDS exhibition

Wednesday, 2nd January, 2019 8:00am
Young scientists tackle the big issues at RDS exhibition

For the 11th year running there are more girls than boys competing, indicating a positive trend in females engaging in the critical subjects.

Young scientists tackle the big issues at RDS exhibition

For the 11th year running there are more girls than boys competing, indicating a positive trend in females engaging in the critical subjects.

DUBLIN finalists of the BT Young Scientist & Technology Exhibition (BTYSTE) are busily preparing their projects for the 55th annual event.

Taking place at the RDS, Dublin from January 9 to 12, the brightest minds from across the island will gather under one roof to compete for the coveted title of BT Young Scientist & Technologist(s) of the Year 2019. 

This year, Dublin is represented by 49 schools from across the county with 105 projects exhibited at the RDS. A totla of 1,137 students across Ireland submitted projects across four categories: Biological & Ecological Sciences; Chemical, Physical & Mathematical Sciences; Social & Behavioural Sciences; and Technology.

The projects for the 55th BTYSTE very much reflect issues of ongoing global concern, with almost 100 qualified projects tackling climate change and environmental issues, doubling last year’s number.

Other projects touch upon topical issues from cervical cancer screening, the alternatives to and benefits of antibiotics; the growing impact of social media; with some even turning their attention to bee-related projects. 

For the 11th year running there are more girls than boys competing, indicating a positive trend in girls engaging in the critical subjects of science, technology and maths at secondary school level.

There is also a 62 per cent increase in the number of girls qualifying for Chemical, Physical & Mathematical Sciences on 2018, traditionally a strong, male dominated category. Overall, 237 schools from across Ireland are sending students to the Exhibition next week.

 Over the past 55 years the BT Young Scientist & Technology Exhibition has played an integral role in inspiring a love of science, technology, engineering and maths among younger generations, and is today an internationally renowned hub for future Irish talent.

The BTYSTE has been the starting stage for some of Ireland’s most successful entrepreneurs and academics with notable BTYSTE alumni including: Steven Collins (1986-7), co-founder of Havok and Swrve; Patrick Collison (2005) the co-founder of Stripe; Kate & Annie Madden (2016) the founders of Fenu Health; and Forbes 30 under-30 and founder of Evervault, Shane Curran (2017), to name but a few. 

Minister for Education and Skills, Joe McHugh, said: “I am heartened and encouraged by the number of students and schools that put forward such innovative and pioneering projects for the BT Young Scientist & Technology Exhibition. 

 “The project title trends always show you what is important to young people in Ireland and this year it is no different with extremely topical themes such as climate change and the environment to the fore. That is why events such as this are so important.”

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