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  • Northside West

Locals hope to influence Phibsborough plan

Monday, 14th May, 2018 8:00am
Locals hope to influence Phibsborough plan

This proposed civic space linking Phibsborough Road and Dalymount Park is part of the plan.

Locals hope to influence Phibsborough plan

This proposed civic space linking Phibsborough Road and Dalymount Park is part of the plan.

LOCALS in Phibsborough are hoping submissions made at an oral hearing to An Bord Pleanála earlier this month will result in a positive outcome for the redevelopment of the shopping centre.

Dublin City Council has already approved plans for the €50 million project that includes new retail spaces and the construction of apartments for 341 students in blocks ranging up to seven storeys. 

The eight-storey office tower at the heart of the shopping centre - often referred to as one of the ugliest buildings in Dublin – won’t be demolished under the plans but instead be given a facelift of clad with expanded metal mesh.

A group of Phibsborough residents including representatives from Phibsboro Tidy Towns and Phizzfest along with local politicians have objected to the plans. 

They want new windows fitted to the office block and for the building to be brought up to current environmental standards and some appellants have described retention of the 50 year old, single glazed, rusting windows in the tower as “an act of architectural vandalism”. 

Fianna Fáil General Election Candidate in Dublin Central, Mary Fitzpatrick, has called the plans “unimaginative” and says they should be rejected.

“The development of Phibsborough has long been impeded by Dublin City Council’s failure to adopt the Local Area Plan which had proposed standards and guidelines for the city village,” she continued.

“The re-development of Phibsborough Shopping Centre presents a unique opportunity to regenerate the run-down and neglected portion of the village.

“However, instead of repeating the design mistakes of the past, residents should be able to expect a more attractive, high quality, clean multiuse complex that provides a mix of housing, recreation and commercial units.

“Dalymount Stadium and the Phibsborough Shopping Centre are adjacent, inter-dependent and intrinsically linked prime urban sites in a vibrant community. It is frustrating that the joint development of the adjoining sites is not being considered.

“This is a crucial opportunity to develop a large area of the village in parallel that I fear may be being lost or perhaps just blatantly ignored.”

Fitzpatrick believes that as Dublin Central already has a high percentage of short-term, single occupancy accommodation there’s no need for student apartments.

"This re-development project should be focused on delivering mixed housing that caters to the residential needs of a number of demographics; public units, starter homes, retirement living,” she continued.

“The large site in Phibsborough presents a once in a generation opportunity to create a quality, sustainable urban village centre where people of all ages can live, work and socialise.

“The heart of village has long been without a green public space that I have no doubt would prove popular with locals. It makes little or no sense given its strategic location that a civic space from the extremely heavily congested national roads wouldn’t be a core part of the plans.”

Read the digital editions of the Dublin People Northside East, Northside West & Southside here