• Northside East

First Irish language version of Walliams’ book launched  

Friday, 17th March, 2017 4:00pm
First Irish language version of Walliams’ book launched  

Girls from Gaelscoil Bhrian Bóroimhe, Swords, pictured at the launch of ‘An Billiúnaí Beag’ at Eason of O’Connell Street. PHOTO: SEÁN Ó MAINNÍN

First Irish language version of Walliams’ book launched  

Girls from Gaelscoil Bhrian Bóroimhe, Swords, pictured at the launch of ‘An Billiúnaí Beag’ at Eason of O’Connell Street. PHOTO: SEÁN Ó MAINNÍN

PUPILS from a Northside school attended the launch of the first ever David Walliams book to be translated into the Irish language, during Seachtain na Gaeilge (Irish Language Week). 

The children, from Gaelscoil Bhrian Bóroimhe, Swords, attended Futa Fata, a Galway-based publisher’s, launch of Billionaire Boy (An Billiúnaí Beag).

David Walliams is the biggest selling children’s author to have started writing since 2000. His books are available in over 46 different languages, of which Gaeilge, is now one! ‘Billionaire Boy’ was first published in 2010.  

In ‘An Billiúnaí Beag’, Joe Práta has many reasons to be happy. In fact, he has about a trillion reasons to be happy because Joe is rich. He is probably the wealthiest 12-year-old in the world and he has everything he could ever want such as a cinema, a bowling alley, even a racing track but, there is one thing Joe needs: a friend.

‘An Billiúnaí Beag’ is Máirín Ní Mhárta’s seventh translation for Futa Fata.  She has previously translated novels from both French and English by authors such as Hervé Mestron and Andy Stanton.  

An Billiúnaí Beag is available nationwide in all good bookshops. 

Futa Fata’s work is kindly supported by COGG, Clár na Leabhar and the Arts Council.

Read the digital editions of the Dublin People Northside East, Northside West & Southside here

Cookies on Dublin People website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. We also use cookies to ensure we show you advertising that is relevant to you. If you continue without changing your settings, we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies on the Dublin People website. However, if you would like to, you can change your cookie settings at any time by amending your browser settings.
How does Dublin People use cookies?
Cookies enable us to identify your device, or you when you have logged in. We use cookies that are strictly necessary to enable you to move around the site or to provide certain basic features. We use cookies to enhance the functionality of the website by storing your preferences, for example. We also use cookies to help us to improve the performance of our website to provide you with a better user experience.
We dont sell the information collected by cookies, nor do we disclose the information to third parties, except where required by law (for example to government bodies and law enforcement agencies).
Hide Message